Antarctica – Stuck in Customs

The Heights of Antarctica

The Egg

Have you ever heard of this short story called The Egg? It takes less than three minutes to read… I have many intellectual and conscious friends that think this may not be a story.

Daily Photo – The Heights of Antarctica

Whenever I was lucky enough to get into a helicopter while in Antarctica, I went absolutely photo-crazy. It was so cold when holding my camera out the window, but I toughened up so that I could get some clean shots. I also had a very strange problem with my camera where the internal shutter kind of shattered. I don’t know how the wind got INSIDE the camera… maybe some blasted in through the edge of the lens. Either way, the camera was a goner but at least I had a backup!

The Heights of Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-18 11:20:20
  • CameraILCE-7S
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/2000
  • Aperture7.1
  • ISO160
  • Focal Length19.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

Inside Cape Evans Hut

Time for our regular Wednesday episode!

Every Wednesday we share a new one of these educational (and hopefully inspirational) videos that we shot in Africa. In this one, I get hands-on with a nice sunset shot…

Daily Photo – Inside Cape Evans Hut

I was lucky enough to visit all three of major expedition huts in Antarctica. This is the final one visited – Cape Evans Hut. If you don’t know your Scotts from your Shackletons, here is some info from Wikipedia:

Scott’s Hut is a building located on the north shore of Cape Evans on Ross Island in Antarctica. It was erected in 1911 by the British Antarctic Expedition of 1910–1913 (also known as the Terra Nova Expedition) led by Robert Falcon Scott. In selecting a base of operations for the 1910–1913 Expedition, Scott rejected the notion of reoccupying the hut he had built by McMurdo Sound during the Discovery Expedition of 1901–1904.

This first hut was located at Hut Point, 20 km south of Cape Evans. Two factors influenced this decision. One was that the hut was extremely cold for living quarters and the other was that Scott’s ship, the Discovery, had been trapped by sea ice at Hut Point, a problem he hoped to avoid by establishing his new base farther north.

Some confusion arises because Discovery Hut can technically be referred to as Scott’s hut, in that his expedition built it, and it was his base ashore during the 1901–1904 expedition, but the title Scott’s Hut popularly belongs to the building erected in 1911 at Cape Evans.

Inside Cape Evans Hut

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-20 11:29:38
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time13
  • Aperture8
  • ISO125
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

Stuck in Shackleton’s Hut

Antarctica Day

BTW, today for Passport Members, you’ll get to see the full slew of all my photos from this amazing continent as well as links to many behind-the-scenes videos.

Antarctica Party!

I bet you haven’t seen ALL of my photos from Antarctica. I’ve only published about 25 on the blog but there are a lot more than that. So, if you want to see them all visit this link.

I believe I’ve published about 6 or 7 videos for Passport members… today I’m sharing one of my favorites with a couple of minutes of extra footage mixed in for those who have seen it before. And, click here if you want to access the Antarctica videos from the Passport archives.

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Daily Photo – Stuck in Shackleton’s Hut

Stu Robertson (pictured here, looking mysterious) and I were dropped off for the day by our helicopter friend (a Kiwi named Hannibal – PERFECT name for a chopper pilot). We were worried we would not have enough time to explore the area, but we ended up here for over 12 hours. We actually had no idea if we would be picked up or not and thought about curling up in one of these beds for the night. They really didn’t want us to touch anything inside, but they technically did not say you couldn’t sleep on things. I know, it’s a bit of a loose loophole, but worth considering all the same!

Stuck in Shackleton’s Hut

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-09 13:14:01
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/20
  • Aperture9.5
  • ISO200
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

Sleeping in an Ice Cave

Passport Goodies

If you’re a Passport Member then you’ve seen about half a dozen of my videos from Antarctica. Here is a link to all the Passport videos published over the past few years and you’ll find them in there!

Daily Photo – Sleeping in an Ice Cave

On my first day in Antarctica, I was shipped off to survival training. This was a great idea, because I’m not much of a survivalist and I could do with a bit of training. We spent most of the day building an ice-block kitchen to protect fro the wind so we could cook some food, set up some blizzard-proof tents, and digging out an ice-cave to sleep in. Now, I didn’t dig out most of this cave, but I definitely got down inside to enjoy its benefits. By the way, in the winter it never gets dark there, so this is what it looks like around midnight.

Sleeping in an Ice Cave

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-08 10:16:05
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/1600
  • Aperture4
  • ISO50
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias+0.7

Comments

A Rather Cold Hut in Antarctica

Antarctica History lesson

This blog is not exactly a bastion for educational matters, but today it is! Here’s a bit of info on Captain Scott’s first expedition to Antarctica, which is of course related to today’s photo. This info comes from the Antarctica Historic Trust.

Robert Falcon Scott’s National Antarctic Expedition 1901–04, a joint initiative between The Royal Geographical Society and The Royal Society, was the second expedition to winter over on the Antarctic continent, and the first to carry out significant exploration and serious scientific research.

Three of the most famous men in Antarctic exploration – Scott, Shackleton and Wilson – achieved a furthest south sledging journey of 82º 16’ S in the summer of 1902–03. On 9 January 1902, a stop was made at Cape Adare where the record left by Borchgrevink was found, and on 4 February, during flights by Scott and Sub-Lieutenant Ernest Shackleton RNR in a hydrogen balloon over the Ross Ice Shelf, Shackleton took the first aerial photographs of Antarctica. On the expedition’s return home, 11 volumes of scientific results were published and Scott was welcomed as a national hero.

BTW, I think it’s funny that there were two groups and they were called “The Royal Geographical Society” and “The Royal Society.” One can only imagine the polite bickering between these two groups over tea.

Daily Photo – A Rather Cold Hut in Antarctica

Here’s an interesting fact about this place. It was actually so cold in here that most men decided to stay on the boat instead. I can certainly attest to how cold it was inside of here. Somehow, it was even colder than outside, but maybe that’s because I was here in the “summer”. The only benefit of being inside is that you get out of the wind. It’s interesting to know this was Scott’s first hut. His second hut made many improvements to this design. If you click on the Antarctica category, you’ll see a lot more.

A Rather Cold Hut in Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-19 19:54:25
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time10
  • Aperture8
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

Folded Ice in Antarctica

Want to see 7+ Antarctica Videos

Then you should become a Passport Member! We have all seven of those videos and about a hundred more waiting for you in the vault… it’s full of treasure, that vault! Come join up, and if you don’t love it, you can have all your money back of course. 🙂

Daily Photo – Folded ice in Antarctica

Now, even though I took thousands and thousands of photos of ice in Antarctica, I am not sure I took enough! I’m still going through new photos that I haven’t processed yet, and I am starting to see the end of the well. There’s a mild panic inside of me! I do have somewhat of a little plan. I’m going to try to get back in touch with Antarctica New Zealand to see if I can make another go at the frozen continent. I’ve come up with all sorts of ideas I want to explore down there!

Folded ice in Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-12 02:11:07
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/6400
  • Aperture4
  • ISO80
  • Focal Length18.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias-0.7

Comments

Desolation in Antarctica

Burning Man Photo Walk!

At my 8th Annual Photo Walk at Burning Man, a great time was had by all! Come over and check out the Discussion area of the event to see what new photos have been posted!

One of the Big New Features in Aurora HDR 2019

Check out this video where I go in depth with LUTs and Presets (now called Looks) in Aurora HDR 2019. Only a week left to pre-order and if you buy the bundle you get an extra pack of Experimental Looks to compliment the built-in set… and a pack of Cinematic LUTs too!

Daily Photo – Desolation in Antarctica

I took this from a helicopter while flying back from the Dry Valleys to the New Zealand base. It was a long flight and it’s stirring how desolate everything there is. Every now and then you see these enormous formations shoot out of the ice. I can’t imagine how old they are… they must have been formed ice ages ago. Also, it’s crazy to imagine those old explorers from a hundred years ago with dog sled teams going hundreds of miles through such a nihilistic landscape.

Desolation in Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-09 11:10:21
  • CameraILCE-7M2
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/2000
  • Aperture4
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length20.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

Seals for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner (and Seal Snacks)

Passport Sunday!

I’m starting a new thing where I guarantee a new entry every Sunday for Passport Members. I figure Sunday is just about the laziest day of the week for most people, so it’s a good day for learning. Make a point to grab your morning coffee (feel free to put some whisky in it), and then sit down to enjoy the weekly video release! Today is one from Antarctica. To get you in the mood, here is my Antarctica Album!

Today’s video release is the 7th video I’ve released from the month I spent in Antarctica. It’s all about exploring another hut, technology, taking photos, and time capsules!

Antarctica: Hut & Cold

I was lucky enough to visit all the huts in Antarctica where explorers from a century ago used to live. It’s really unbelievable they were able to survive. Even more amazing is that all of these huts had a very tiny little dark room for editing photos. I can imagine that the photographer on the trip was probably one of the most popular dudes because there must have been some excitement about the photo creation process. I know how long it takes to manually develop film, so I bet by the time he was finished with the photo there was quite a little celebration. Remember, they didn’t have Netflix (at least, I think).

On the tech side, I also talk a little bit about what happens with long exposures with noise reduction turned on.

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Daily Photo – Seals for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner (and Seal Snacks)

I took photos in all the huts (as you can see in the album link above) to try to capture not just the details, but the mood. This particular one was so desolate and cold that many members of the expedition chose to stay on the boat, where I can’t imagine it was a lot warmer. But, I guess it was fun to come over here and have a seal sandwich or a seal smoothie.

Seals for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner (and Seal Snacks)

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-19 19:54:25
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time10
  • Aperture8
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

Comments

The Long Plane Ride to Antarctica

Tip Video – Making Grass more Supple and Dreamy

In today’s video, I show how to use Aurora HDR to make the grass look extra soft and alive. I have a theory about landscape photos in that people imagine walking around inside of them. A lot of people imagine walking barefooted around inside… so I like to do little things like make the grass look extra squishy or sand look extra warm and soft. Anyway, enjoy!

Daily Photo – The Long Plane Ride to Antarctica

Now, I always get a bit of feedback from plane experts when I give the model number of this particular unit. But I THINK it is a CL-130 Hercules. It’s modified so that it lands on skis instead of wheels for the giant ice runway on the mainland of Antarctica. As you can see, it’s not exactly built for comfort and business-class service specs on board. But, all things considered, it was actually quite comfortable. I spent most of the time up, walking around and taking photos. I got to be good friends with Randy the loadmaster and a lot of the rest of the crew too. There was plenty of time because I think it was about a ten hour ride! On board here were people from all four bases. I was on my way to the New Zealand base, but the other nations represented were the US, Italy, and Korea.

The Long Plane Ride to Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-06 10:04:15
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/45
  • Aperture
  • ISO2000
  • Focal Length
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias+2

Comments

Experimenting in Antarctica

Random thoughts on composition in Puerto Rico

This is a video I made in San Juan just before the hurricane hit. I haven’t been back, but I may go later this year to see what it’s like now. I figure this area that I show is pretty much the same… the old town is a great area to for exploration and photography. I recommend it! 🙂

Daily Photo – Experimenting in Antarctica

When I visited the reconstructed huts across Antarctica, I was impressed by the amount of scientific work that they performed inside. If you click on this photo and zoom into 100%, you’ll see all sorts of beakers, chemicals, and other things you might find in a medieval apothecary. I can’t imagine what sorts of scientific experiments were going on because there’s not a huge amount of biological diversity down there. It’s 99% snow, ice, and water with an occasional penguin.

Experimenting in Antarctica

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2015-01-20 10:53:22
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time30
  • Aperture9
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias+2

Comments

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